One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

Book - 1963
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Baker & Taylor
Presents a new translation of the fictional account of the daily hardship a prisoner endures in a Stalinist labor camp

McMillan Palgrave
The only English translation authorized by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

First published in the Soviet journal Novy Mir in 1962, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich stands as a classic of contemporary literature. The story of labor-camp inmate Ivan Denisovich Shukhov, it graphically describes his struggle to maintain his dignity in the face of communist oppression. An unforgettable portrait of the entire world of Stalin's forced work camps, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich is one of the most extraordinary literary documents to have emerged from the Soviet Union and confirms Solzhenitsyn's stature as "a literary genius whose talent matches that of Dosotevsky, Turgenev, Tolstoy"--Harrison Salisbury

This unexpurgated 1991 translation by H. T. Willetts is the only authorized edition available and fully captures the power and beauty of the original Russian.


Publisher: New York, Praeger [1963]
ISBN: 9780370014548
0370014545
9780374521950
0374521956
Branch Call Number: FICTION SOLZHENITSYN
Characteristics: xxiv, 210 p. 22 cm

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baldand
Aug 26, 2017

We are all familiar with the Hollywood Second World War films, where a bunch of grunts of different ethnicities and faiths are wielded into a cohesive unit. Think, for instance, of ("The Thin Red Line". Oddly, Solzhenitsyn's masterpiece in some ways conforms to this genre. His hero, Ivan, is in fact, a Red Army soldier, perversely serving a 10-year term for succeeding in escaping Nazi captivity. His unit is multi-ethnic, containing a Western Ukrainian, an Estonian, a Balt, someone of mixed Greek, Jewish and other ethnicity, and a Russian Baptist, Alyosha, stands out from the other ethnic Russians given Russia's Orthodox traditions. As in the Hollywood movies, the unit is held together by a brave, strong-willed unit leader. Where it differs from Hollywood is that the unit is not bent on defeating the Japanese or the Germans, but simply on surviving the brutality of the camps.

r
raul_fvrl
Jul 21, 2017

I first read this book in the early 70's. Every few years I pick it up and re-read it. Such a poignant story with great depth and clarity. I will be reading this book again in the coming years.

j
jskev
Apr 28, 2012

One of the best books I've ever read. Read this translation- no other. All the litery tools are kept by this translator. He keeps it a work of art. It does have Strong language but is a must read for all literature lovers like myself. Please read it and i promise you wont regret it.(Aprx: 150 pg)

m
macierules
Nov 27, 2011

This story was beautifully told - very simple and direct. It left the reader reminded about what is really important in life and how man is equipped for survival. Rather upbeat considering the setting. Next time I sit to eat a meal, I'll be thinking of this book.

Nita101 Aug 22, 2011

This book is VERY VERY boring. This book drags on and on and doesnt have things that would catch your attention. I know it is only 139 pages and that seems short but with how uninteresting the book is, it may take you forever to read those 139 pages. Bad Read.

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