Spook Country

Spook Country

Book - 2007
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Penguin Putnam
Tito is in his early twenties. Born in Cuba, he speaks fluent Russian, lives in one room in a NoLita warehouse, and does delicate jobs involving information transfer.

Hollis Henry is an investigative journalist, on assignment from a magazine called Node. Node doesn't exist yet, which is fine; she's used to that. But it seems to be actively blocking the kind of buzz that magazines normally cultivate before they start up. Really actively blocking it. It's odd, even a little scary, if Hollis lets herself think about it much. Which she doesn't; she can't afford to.

Milgrim is a junkie. A high-end junkie, hooked on prescription antianxiety drugs. Milgrim figures he wouldn't survive twenty-four hours if Brown, the mystery man who saved him from a misunderstanding with his dealer, ever stopped supplying those little bubble packs. What exactly Brown is up to Milgrim can't say, but it seems to be military in nature. At least, Milgrim's very nuanced Russian would seem to be a big part of it, as would breaking into locked rooms.

Bobby Chombo is a "producer," and an enigma. In his day job, Bobby is a troubleshooter for manufacturers of military navigation equipment. He refuses to sleep in the same place twice. He meets no one. Hollis Henry has been told to find him.

Pattern Recognition was a bestseller on every list of every major newspaper in the country, reaching #4 on the New York Times list. It was also a BookSense top ten pick, a WordStock bestseller, a best book of the year for Publishers Weekly, the Los Angeles Times, Newsday, and the Economist, and a Washington Post "rave."

Spook Country is the perfect follow-up to Pattern Recognition, which was called by The Washington Post (among many glowing reviews), "One of the first authentic and vital novels of the twenty-first century."

Baker & Taylor
Multilingual Tito engages in sensitive information transfers from his single-room apartment, while journalist Hollis frets over her start-up magazine's censure of its own promotions, and prescription drug addict Milgrim wonders about the military connections of an enigmatic benefactor.

Blackwell North Amer
Hollis Henry is a journalist, on investigative assignment from a magazine called Node. Node doesn't exist yet, which is fine, she's used to that, but it seems to be actively preventing the kind of buzz that magazines normally cultivate before they begin to exist. That would be odd, and even a little scary, if Hollis allowed herself to think about it much, which she can't afford to do.
Tito is in his early twenties. His family came from Cuba. He speaks fluent Russian, lives in one room in a warehouse in Manhattan, and does delicate jobs involving information transfer.
Milgrim is a high end junkie, hooked on prescription anti-anxiety drugs. He figures he wouldn't survive twenty-four hours if Brown, the mystery man who saved him from a misunderstanding with his dealer, ever stopped supplying the little bubble-packs. What Brown is up to, Milgrim can't say. It seems to be military at least. Milgrim's very nuanced Russian is a big part of it, as is breaking into locked rooms.
Bobby Chombo is a "producer." In his day job Bobby is a troubleshooter for military navigation equipment. He refuses to sleep in the same place twice. He meets no one. Hollis Henry has been told to find him.

Baker
& Taylor

Multilingual Tito engages in sensitive information transfers from his single-room warehouse apartment, while investigative journalist Hollis frets over his start-up magazine's censure of its own promotions, and prescription drug addict Milgrim wonders about the military connections of an enigmatic benefactor. 250,000 first printing.

Publisher: New York : G.P. Putnam's Sons, 2007
ISBN: 9780399154300
0399154302
Branch Call Number: FICTION GIBSON
Characteristics: 371 p. ; 24 cm

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d
Daitenchi
Jun 01, 2012

It was a good little book, it was well written just like most all his books....

j
JLMason
Feb 06, 2011

Starts well. Showcases typical Gibson vision for potential future technologies with the virtual, holographic art visible only while wearing special viewing gear. (enhanced reality is coming soon for real)
However, the book drags in the middle and has a pat ending.
Not his best.

k
kwsmith
Dec 10, 2009

As always, Gibson weaves together multiple narrative threads as the tale progresses until everything comes together in the last few pages. In this book Gibson examines the secret world beneath the surface of our own lives. At the end of it all, I was left disappointed -- most of Gibson's previous works provoked more self-introspection than this one.

b
Baharak
Jul 24, 2008

Smart and fun near-future SF -- good read, classic Gibson.

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peregrin
Oct 30, 2008

peregrin thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

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