Man in the Dark

Man in the Dark

Book - 2008
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Baker & Taylor
Recovering from a car accident at his daughter's house and haunted by his wife's recent death and the murder of his granddaughter's boyfriend, Titus, August Brill imagines a parallel world in which America is at war with itself.

McMillan Palgrave

A new novel with a dark political twist from “one of America’s greats.”*

Man in the Dark is Paul Auster’s brilliant, devastating novel about the many realities we inhabit as wars flame all around us.

Seventy-two-year-old August Brill is recovering from a car accident in his daughter’s house in Vermont. When sleep refuses to come, he lies in bed and tells himself stories, struggling to push back thoughts about things he would prefer to forget—his wife’s recent death and the horrific murder of his granddaughter’s boyfriend, Titus. The retired book critic imagines a parallel world in which America is not at war with Iraq but with itself. In this other America the twin towers did not fall and the 2000 election results led to secession, as state after state pulled away from the union and a bloody civil war ensued. As the night progresses, Brill’s story grows increasingly intense, and what he is so desperately trying to avoid insists on being told. Joined in the early hours by his granddaughter, he gradually opens up to her and recounts the story of his marriage. After she falls asleep, he at last finds the courage to revisit the trauma of Titus’s death.

Passionate and shocking, Man in the Dark is a novel of our moment, a book that forces us to confront the blackness of night even as it celebrates the existence of ordinary joys in a world capable of the most grotesque violence.

*Time Out (Chicago)



Blackwell North Amer
Seventy-two-year-old August Brill is at his daughter's house in Vermont, recovering from a car accident. When sleep refuses to come, he lies in bed and tells himself stories, struggling to push back thoughts about things he would prefer to forget - his wife's recent death and the horrific murder of his granddaughter's boyfriend, Titus.
The retired book critic imagines a parallel world in which America is not at war with Iraq but with itself. In this other America the twin towers did not fall and the 2000 election results led to secession, as state after state pulled away from the union and a bloody civil war ensued. As the night progresses, Brill's story grows increasingly intense, and what he is so desperately trying to avoid insists on being told, Joined in the early hours by his granddaughter, he gradually opens up to her and recounts the story of his marriage. After she falls asleep, he at last finds the courage to revisit the trauma of Titus's death.

Baker
& Taylor

Recovering from a car accident at his daughter's house in Vermont, retired book critic August Brill spends his time haunted by his wife's recent death and the brutal murder of his granddaughter's boyfriend, Titus, imagining a parallel world in which America is torn apart by even darker political realities. 75,000 first printing.

Publisher: New York : Henry Holt and Co., c2008
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780805088397
0805088393
Branch Call Number: FICTION AUSTER
Characteristics: 180 p

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Filthy_Doves
Apr 26, 2016

The book didn't quite keep me interested as Auster's other work did. I would say this is one of his most boring books but not the most terrible thing I've read.

p
Pisinga
Apr 16, 2012

Another boring book.
The only thing I liked in it, despite the horror of the content, three or four stories that are inserted into the book, about other people, most of all, about the cruel death of these people.
What is the genre of this book? Is it against the war? This anti-war theme is absolutely weak in this book. The story of Brick is as a children's story.
Typical senile loneliness, betrayals, unnecessary late confessions...
A work of art should capture the reader. If, after or during of reading, you need to strain to understand possible allegories, symbolisms, abstracts, and so on, then there are other genres for that. Read, and then try to explain what it all meant - brings boredom.
Moreover, in recent years, there are a lot books about the same thing.

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