When Affirmative Action Was White

When Affirmative Action Was White

An Untold History of Racial Inequality in Twentieth-century America

Book - 2005
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Baker & Taylor
A study on the lesser-known origins of affirmative action argues that key programs passed during the New Deal and Fair Deal era of the 1930s and 1940s were purposefully discriminatory, revealing how Southern democrats widened the gap between black and white Americans through specific restrictions in social security, the GI bill, and landmark labor laws. Reprint.

Norton Pub
In this "penetrating new analysis" (New York Times Book Review) Ira Katznelson fundamentally recasts our understanding of twentieth-century American history and demonstrates that all the key programs passed during the New Deal and Fair Deal era of the 1930s and 1940s were created in a deeply discriminatory manner. Through mechanisms designed by Southern Democrats that specifically excluded maids and farm workers, the gap between blacks and whites actually widened despite postwar prosperity. In the words of noted historian Eric Foner, "Katznelson's incisive book should change the terms of debate about affirmative action, and about the last seventy years of American history."
A groundbreaking work that exposes the twisted origins of affirmative action.

Publisher: New York : W.W. Norton, c2005
Edition: Paper back edition
ISBN: 9780393328516
0393328511
Branch Call Number: 323.1196 K19
323.1196 KAT
Characteristics: 238 p. ; 21 cm

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