Nomad

Nomad

From Islam to America : A Personal Journey Through the Clash of Civilizations

Book - 2010/05/18
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Baker & Taylor
Describes the author's experiences after moving to America to pursue a safer life, from her renewed contact with her family after her father's death to her struggles to embrace new principles in the face of attempts to prohibit her work.

Blackwell Publishing
"This woman is a major hero of our time.ùRichard Dawkins

Ayaan Hirsi Ali captured the world's attention with Infidel, her compelling coming-of-age memoir, which spent thirty-one weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. Now, in Nomad Hirsi Ali tells of coming to America to build a new life, an ocean away from the death threats made to her by European Islamists, the strife she witnessed, and the inner conflict she suffered. It is the story of her physical journey to freedom and, more crucially, her emotional journey to freedomùher transition from a tribal mind-set that restricts women's every thought and action to a life as a free and equal citizen in an open society Through stories of the challenges she has faced, she shows the difficulty of reconciling the contradictions of Islam with Western values.

In these pages Hirsi Ali recounts the many turns her life took after she broke with her family, and how she struggled to throw off restrictive superstitions and misconceptions that initially hobbled her ability to assimilate into Western society. She writes movingly of her reconciliation, on his deathbed, with her devout father, who had disowned her when she renounced Islam after 9/11, as well as with her mother and cousins in Somalia and in Europe.

Nomad is a portrait of a family torn apart by the clash of civilizations. But it is also a touching, uplifting, and often funny account of one woman's discovery of today's America. While Hirsi Ali loves much of what she encounters, she fears we are repeating the European mistake of underestimating radical Islam. She calls on key institutions of the Westùincluding universities, the feminist movement, and the Christian churchesùto enact specific, innovative remedies that would help other Muslim immigrants to overcome the challenges she has experienced and to resist the fatal allure of fundamentalism and terrorism.

This is Hirsi Ali's intellectual coming-of-age, a memoir that conveys her philosophy as well as her experiences, and that also conveys an urgent message and missionùto inform the West of the extent of the threat from Islam, both from outside and from within our open societies. A celebration of free speech and democracy, Nomad is an important contribution to the history of ideas, but above all a rousing call to action.

Baker
& Taylor

The activist and best-selling author of Infidel describes her experiences after moving to America to pursue a safer life, from her renewed contact with her family after her father's death to her struggles to embrace new principles in the face of Islamic attempts to prohibit her work.

Simon and Schuster
"This woman is a major hero of our time." —Richard Dawkins

Ayaan Hirsi Ali captured the world’s attention with Infidel, her compelling coming-of-age memoir, which spent thirty-one weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. Now, in Nomad, Hirsi Ali tells of coming to America to build a new life, an ocean away from the death threats made to her by European Islamists, the strife she witnessed, and the inner conflict she suffered. It is the story of her physical journey to freedom and, more crucially, her emotional journey to freedom—her transition from a tribal mind-set that restricts women’s every thought and action to a life as a free and equal citizen in an open society. Through stories of the challenges she has faced, she shows the difficulty of reconciling the contradictions of Islam with Western values.

In these pages Hirsi Ali recounts the many turns her life took after she broke with her family, and how she struggled to throw off restrictive superstitions and misconceptions that initially hobbled her ability to assimilate into Western society. She writes movingly of her reconciliation, on his deathbed, with her devout father, who had disowned her when she renounced Islam after 9/11, as well as with her mother and cousins in Somalia and in Europe.

Nomad is a portrait of a family torn apart by the clash of civilizations. But it is also a touching, uplifting, and often funny account of one woman’s discovery of today’s America. While Hirsi Ali loves much of what she encounters, she fears we are repeating the European mistake of underestimating radical Islam. She calls on key institutions of the West—including universities, the feminist movement, and the Christian churches—to enact specific, innovative remedies that would help other Muslim immigrants to overcome the challenges she has experienced and to resist the fatal allure of fundamentalism and terrorism.

This is Hirsi Ali’s intellectual coming-of-age, a memoir that conveys her philosophy as well as her experiences, and that also conveys an urgent message and mission—to inform the West of the extent of the threat from Islam, both from outside and from within our open societies. A celebration of free speech and democracy, Nomad is an important contribution to the history of ideas, but above all a rousing call to action.

Publisher: New York : Free Press, 2010/05/18
Edition: 1st Free Press hardcover ed
ISBN: 9781439157312
1439157316
Branch Call Number: 305.8935 HIR
Characteristics: xxi, 277 p. ; 24 cm

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Here, there is more family detail than her earlier book, "Infidel." Part III: "Sex, Money, and Violence," is particularly interesting, as is Part IV: "Remedies."

s
shabanamir
May 09, 2017

It blows my mind to see professional haters financed by hatemongering organizations represented so well on the shelves of my public library. Tax dollars at work?
https://www.splcenter.org/20161025/journalists-manual-field-guide-anti-muslim-extremists#ali

e
empbee
Dec 27, 2016

Good writing though at times repetitive. Thought provoking issues about parental resistance to change in a new environment; the conflict between generations, the importance of education for both young and older people, immigrants or not.

redban Sep 04, 2014

I enjoyed Ayaan's first book [Infidel] much more than this one. Her critique of fundamentalism is obviously legitimate and crucial. However, this book in particular is sparse on insight when supporting American intervention. America is not the ONLY country in the world that claims to be against Islamic fundamentalism, so I do not see why it is put on a pedestal so uncritically. How about America's support of Saudi Arabia, a source of so much extremism? How about America's military interventions in Iran, derailing their secular progress? (Let's not forget the other assassinations, support of dictators, funding of death squads, and overt occupations all over Latin America, Southeast Asia, Africa, and the Middle East to combat nationalization which threaten America's corporate hegemony). Then there's financial imperialism (i.e. Wall Street), which through the use of debt and fraud is much more hidden than overt violence and terror. Both sides of America should be evaluated to get a complete picture of American foreign policy and its role in preventing extremism. The comment by John_M also brings up good points.

redban Sep 04, 2014

I enjoyed Ayaan's first book [Infidel] more than this one. Her critique of fundamentalism is obviously legitimate and crucial. However, this book in particular is sparse on insight when supporting America. America is not the only country in the world that claims to be against Islamic fundamentalism, so I do not see why it is put on a pedestal so uncritically. How about America's support of Saudi Arabia, a source of so much extremism? How about America's military interventions in Iran, derailing their secular progress? How about America's support of Israel? Both sides should be considered to get a complete picture of American foreign policy and its role in preventing fundamentalism.

j
John_M
Mar 30, 2013

The issue of integrating Muslim immigrants into western society is important and Ayaan attacks this head on. However, I found that she dwelt far too much on the anecdotes of her own life. Anecdotes may point a researcher in the direction of a course of research, but never should be provided as evidence of the roots of the problem being studied, in this case the integration of Muslim immigrants. I found that she was not clear about the issues which stem from the tribal customs that immigrants come with and the Muslim beliefs that they have. Her idea of engaging the Roman Catholic Church in changing the beliefs of the immigrants seems like a non-starter to me. I feel that we need to educate immigrants in the laws of Western society and the mechanisms which are currently available change these laws, currently democratic dialog and agreement. Immigrants must accept the current laws and the mechanisms for change, in the event that they would like the laws changed, before settling in the Western countries. Perhaps this is just as idealistic as some of the suggestions that she had.

a
Amille05
Jan 24, 2012

As always, amazing, amazing, amazing. What a genuinely remarkable person! a must read!

BPLNextBestAdults May 31, 2011

After a harrowing childhood lived according to a particularly strict interpretation of Muslim law, Somali-born Ali escaped to Europe rather than move to Canada to marry a man she'd never met. Arriving in Holland, she soon became an international celebrity for her willingness to publicly denounce the uglier sides of Islamic culture, particularly as it relates to the oppression of women and girls. Many personal stories are repeated from her earlier book, “Infidel”, but here the story of her immigration to the U.S. is included. "Nomad" is a portrait of a family torn apart by the clash of civilizations. Her indictment of Islam and the oppression of women is harsh but very revealing.
This was a heartfelt and thought-provoking book to listen to. The author's voice provided an authenticity that was very charming.

j
judyshewchuk
Mar 25, 2011

This book, together with Infidel, are very important works for anyone interested in human rights, and especially the plight of women. Exceptionally well written by a brave and intelligent woman.

i
ireader
Sep 13, 2010

Great insight into the difficulties faced by Muslim women.

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snowish
Dec 14, 2011

Muhammad says my husband can beat me and that I am worth half as much as a man. Is it I who is being disrespectful to Muhammad in criticizing his legacy, or is it he who is disrespectful to me?

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