Adapt

Adapt

Why Success Always Starts With Failure

Book - 2011/05/10
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Baker & Taylor
Outlines a counterintuitive approach to changing the world by assessing its failures, drawing on myriad disciplines to argue that complex challenges must be met through adaptive trial-and-error practices that do not depend on expert opinions or ready-made solutions.

McMillan Palgrave

In this groundbreaking book, Tim Harford, the Undercover Economist, shows us a new and inspiring approach to solving the most pressing problems in our lives. When faced with complex situations, we have all become accustomed to looking to our leaders to set out a plan of action and blaze a path to success. Harford argues that today’s challenges simply cannot be tackled with ready-made solutions and expert opinion; the world has become far too unpredictable and profoundly complex. Instead, we mustadapt.

Deftly weaving together psychology, evolutionary biology, anthropology, physics, and economics, along with the compelling story of hard-won lessons learned in the field, Harford makes a passionate case for the importance of adaptive trial and error in tackling issues such as climate change, poverty, and financial crises—as well as in fostering innovation and creativity in our business and personal lives.

Taking us from corporate boardrooms to the deserts of Iraq, Adapt clearly explains the necessary ingredients for turning failure into success. It is a breakthrough handbook for surviving—and prospering— in our complex and ever-shifting world.



Baker
& Taylor

Outlines a counter-intuitive approach to changing the world by assessing its failures, drawing on myriad disciplines to argue that today's complex challenges must be met through adaptive trial-and-error practices that do not depend on expert opinions or ready-made solutions. By the award-winning author of The Undercover Economist. 50,000 first printing.

Publisher: New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2011/05/10
ISBN: 9780374100964
0374100969
Branch Call Number: 155.24 HAR
Characteristics: 320

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Ivan W. Taylor
Nov 06, 2014

I really like Tim Harford. This book has a lot of good ideas. It is unfortunate that he starts the book by describing the successful turnaround of the second Iraq war. But that is a risk you take when you discuss current affairs. I liked his idea that monetary prizes can inspire outsiders to solve complex problems.

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ReidCooper
Jan 10, 2012

This well-written book uses some sharp, memorable examples drawn from real life. Harford gives many examples from the military and business worlds of how the world has proven to be more complicated and surprising that many experts and leaders thought. He uses these examples to argue that it is important for organizations to be open to feedback and diverse approaches to solving problems, and to avoid groupthink and conformism. While parts of this uneven book are quite insightful, Harford ironically makes some of the very mistakes he warns against. Harford clearly wants to be a sort of British business press version of Malcolm Gladwell. Unfortunately, Harford is both more ideological than Gladwell and less humble - which is odd, given his message of the need to learn from our mistakes and nurture experiments.

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