17 items
The Sea in Winter - By Christine Day
Web Resource
Upper Skagit author; fiction. "It’s been a hard year for Maisie Cannon, ever since she hurt her leg and could not keep up with her ballet training an...Show more Upper Skagit author; fiction. "It’s been a hard year for Maisie Cannon, ever since she hurt her leg and could not keep up with her ballet training and auditions. Her blended family is loving and supportive, but Maisie knows that they just can’t understand how hopeless she feels. With everything she’s dealing with, Maisie is not excited for their family midwinter road trip along the coast, near the Makah community where her mother grew up. But soon, Maisie’s anxieties and dark moods start to hurt as much as the pain in her knee. How can she keep pretending to be strong when on the inside she feels as roiling and cold as the ocean?" - from author's webpage Show less
I Can Make This Promise
Book - 2019
The Brave
Book - 2020
Ancestor Approved: Intertribal Stories For Kids
Book - 20210209
Apple Skin to the Core
A Memoir in Words and Pictures
Book - 2020
The Grizzly Mother - By Hetxw'ms Gyetxw (Brett D. Huson) and Illustrated By Natasha Donovan
Web Resource
Gitxsan author and Métis illustrator; this book is part of the Mothers of Xsan series if you would like to read more; non-fiction told as a story. "A...Show more Gitxsan author and Métis illustrator; this book is part of the Mothers of Xsan series if you would like to read more; non-fiction told as a story. "An engaging look at how the animals, people, and seasons within an ecosystem are intertwined. To the Gitxsan people of Northwestern British Columbia, the grizzly is an integral part of the natural landscape. Together, they share the land and forests that the Skeena River runs through, as well as the sockeye salmon within it. Follow mother bear as she teaches her cubs what they need to survive on their own." - Highwater Press Show less
A Girl Called Echo, Vol. 1, Pemmican Wars By Katherena Vermette
Web Resource
Métis author; graphic novel; currently four volumes in the series. "The Manitoba Act’s promise of land for the Métis has gone unfulfilled, and many M...Show more Métis author; graphic novel; currently four volumes in the series. "The Manitoba Act’s promise of land for the Métis has gone unfulfilled, and many Métis flee to the Northwest. As part of the fallout from the Northwest Resistance, their advocate and champion Louis Riel is executed. As new legislation corrodes Métis land rights, and unscrupulous land speculators and swindlers take advantage, many Métis begin to settle on road allowances and railway land, often on the fringes of urban centres. For Echo, the plight of her family is apparent. Burnt out of their home in Ste. Madeleine when their land is cleared for pasture, they make their way to Rooster Town, squatting on the southwest edges of Winnipeg. In this final instalment of Echo’s story, she is reminded of the strength and resilience of her people, forged through the loss and pain of the past, as she faces a triumphant future." - Highwater Press Show less
Indian No More
Book - 2019
The Birchbark House
Book - 2002
The Game of Silence
Book - 2005
The Porcupine Year
Book - 2008/09/01
Chickadee
Book - 2013
Makoons
Book - 2016
In the Footsteps of Crazy Horse
Book - 2015
My Name is Not Easy - By Debby Dahl Edwardson
Web Resource
Author's husband and community is Inupiaq; historical fiction. "Luke knows his I'nupiaq name is full of sounds white people can't say. He knows he'll...Show more Author's husband and community is Inupiaq; historical fiction. "Luke knows his I'nupiaq name is full of sounds white people can't say. He knows he'll have to leave it behind when he and his brothers are sent to boarding school hundreds of miles from their Arctic village. At Sacred Heart School things are different. Instead of family, there are students -- Eskimo, Indian, White -- who line up on different sides of the cafeteria like there's some kind of war going on. And instead of comforting words like tutu and maktak, there's English. Speaking I'nupiaq -- or any native language -- is forbidden. And Father Mullen, whose fury is like a force of nature, is ready to slap down those who disobey. Luke struggles to survive at Sacred Heart. But he's not the only one. There's smart-aleck Amiq, a daring leader -- if he doesn't self destruct; Chickie, blond and freckled, a different kind of outsider; and small quiet Junior, noticing everything and writing it all down. Each has their own story to tell. But once their separate stories come together, things at Sacred Heart School -- and in the wider world -- will never be the same." Show less
Navajo Code Talkers: Top Secret Messengers of World War II - By Blake Hoena
Web Resource
Graphic novel; non-fiction; history. "During World War II U.S. forces had to keep battle plans and other top secret information out of the enemy's ha...Show more Graphic novel; non-fiction; history. "During World War II U.S. forces had to keep battle plans and other top secret information out of the enemy's hands. Coded messages were often used, but secret codes could be broken. To solve this problem, the U.S. military turned to an unexpected source to create an unbreakable code. The Navajo people spoke a complex language that few outsiders knew how to speak. Several Navajo soldiers were recruited to develop a code based on the Navajo language. The result was a complex code that could not be solved by the enemy. Learn all about the brave Navajo Code Talkers and how their unbreakable code helped defeat the enemy and win the war." - Capstone Show less
Navajo Code Talkers - By Nathan Aaseng
Web Resource
Non-fiction; history. "On the Pacific front during World War II, strange messages were picked up by American and Japanese forces on land and at sea. ...Show more Non-fiction; history. "On the Pacific front during World War II, strange messages were picked up by American and Japanese forces on land and at sea. The messages were totally unintelligible to everyone except a small select group within the Marine Corps: the Navajo code talkers-a group of Navajos communicating in a code based on the Navajo language. This code, the first unbreakable one in U.S. history, was a key reason that the Allies were able to win in the Pacific." - Walker & Company Show less
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